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Thanks very much for visiting and apologies for any inconvenience.

Lindon Wallet – Dilly Bags (hand printed)

$44.00

This wallet captures a tiny bit of the iconic Kundjabarrk (Dilly bags) fabric design. Our Lindon wallet is well made and sturdy and feels really good in your hand. Makes a lovely and unique gift.

Features fabric designed by Priscilla Badari, Sylvia Badari, Lynne Nadjown and Katra Nganjmirra and hand printed in Gunbalanya, NT.

Free shipping in Australia.

Availability: 1 in stock

Fabric: Cotton feature base cloth and cotton lining.
Color: The base cloth color is ‘chops’ a warm brown and the inks are deep red and pink/orange. The lining is maroon – the photograph in brown is to show the details of the Lindon wallet.

W: 11.5 cm (4.5 inches)
H: 9 cm (3.5 inches)

Features:

  • Central insert for 2 visual ID cards
  • 6 slip-in card pockets
  • Two full length pocket/compartments for notes
  • Zippered full length internal pocket
  • Limited edition – only 3 ever made
  • Fabric design story supplied with each wallet
  • Fabric hand printed in Australia
  • Can be gently hand washed

The fabric was hand screen printed in the community by local Aboriginal printers. This wallet was made by Kravan House, our Cambodian social enterprise partner that has been employing and training disabled artisans since 2003.

Please note that each wallet is unique and the placement of the fabric design is different and wonderful on each item.

Design: This collaborative design was created by four Kunwinjku daluk (women) artists, Priscilla Badari, Lynne Nadjowh, Sylvia Badari and Katra Nganjmirra. These women are all talented fibre artists and have works featured in “Twined Together” (2005).

The design
Gundjabarrk is a woven dilly bag which was used by daluk (women) to gather and carry bush foods in. They would gather Karrbarda (yams), mankinjdjek (cheeky yams) and other bushfoods such as bush honey. Gundjabarrk were also used to carry cooked meats such as kurdukadji (emu) and Kunj (Kangaroo). Women would secure their gundjabarrk with two sticks in the shallow running water of a creek and leave them there to wash the yams overnight, in the morning they would come and tip out the yams onto some paperbark and eat them for breakfast. Bininj (aboriginal men) would also use gundjabarrk to carry their tools such as Karramalk (stone axes) and lawk (stone blades) for cutting meat up with. Some wore them on their shoulders and some around their heads like the daluk. This design was based on real examples of woven dilly bags at Injalak Arts with all their variety of pattern and weaving techniques. The women have created a beautiful design that continues to express their connection with their cultural heritage through new mediums.*

Injalak Arts is a non-profit, fully Aboriginal owned arts corporation located Gunbalanya in West Arnhem Land in remote Australia. The 300 members make beautiful arts and crafts. Their print workshop is busy with new screenprinted fabrics being created daily. They have an extraordinary 47 different fabric designs all created by the members and use lots of different base cloths (all natural fibres) and two teams of printers – men and women. Injalak Arts is registered as a charity in Australia.

Visit the Injalak Arts Etsy shop to see an amazing range of fabrics and other high quality authentic hand-made products: https://www.etsy.com/au/shop/InjalakArts

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