Cushion – Janganpa (Possum) – Stephen Jupurrula Nelson

$69.00

Vibrant, pure wool, fair trade cushion cover adds warmth and texture to your home. Front of each cushion is embroidered with wool and back is cotton canvas. Zip closure.

Artist: Stephen Jupurrula Nelson from Warlukurlangu Artists, Yuendumu, Northern Territory of Australia.

Free shipping in Australia.

Out of stock

Size: 40 cm x 40 cm (16 x 16 inches)
Fabric: wool (front) and cotton (back)
Color: this cover is even more vibrant and gorgeous in real life.
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CARE INSTRUCTIONS: These cushion covers feel great and are fabulously hardwearing – we can vouch for that.
Do not put place/use in direct sunlight or colors may fade. To clean – dry cleaning recommended. It is possible with careful hand-wash in warm water using a wool detergent. Creases can be ironed out on a wool (low) steam setting.
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Design: Janganpa Jukurrpa (Possum Ancestral Creation Story)

About the design:
Janganpa Jukurrpa (common brush-tail possum [Trichosurus vulpecula] Creation Story) travels all over Warlpiri country. ‘Janganpa’ are nocturnal animals that often nest in the hollows of white gum trees (‘wapunungka’). This story comes from a big hill called Mawurrji, west of Yuendumu and north of Pikilyi (Vaughan Springs). A group of ‘janganpa’ ancestors resided there. Every night they would go out in search of food. Their hunting trips took them to Wirlki and Wanapirdi, where they found ‘pamapardu’ (flying ants). They journeyed on to Ngarlkirdipini looking for water. A Nampijinpa women was living at Mawurrji with her two daughters. She gave her daughters in marriage to a Jupurrurla ‘janganpa’ but later decided to run away with them. The Jupurrurla angrily pursued the woman. He tracked them to Mawurrji where he killed them with a stone axe. Their bodies are now rocks at this place. Warlpiri people perform a young men’s initiation ceremony, which involves the Janganpa Jukurrpa. The Janganpa Jukurrpa belongs to Jakamarra/Jupurrurla men and Nakamarra/Napurrurla women. In Warlpiri paintings traditional iconography is used to represent this Jukurrpa. ‘Janganpa’ tracks are often represented as ‘E’ shaped figures and concentric circles are used to depict the trees in which the ‘janganpa’ live, and also the sites at Mawurrji.©2018

About the BWA chainstitch kilim products
These beautiful, unique textiles are a cross-cultural collaboration combining Aboriginal designs and traditional Kashmiri rug-making techniques. Chain stitched, using hand dyed wool, each is a completely handmade piece. A more empowering way to work, this brings many direct benefits to the artists’ and their community. Control and ownership of intellectual property are also maintained. Purchase of these products guarantees a direct return to the Aboriginal artist and their community.

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